Creating ideal conditions for learning

I TEACH

Are you a teacher? Then you are more important than you realize. You have a secret Superpower that can touch and change lives. Your influence is much more significant than you know. Don’t ignore your superpower.  Make smart use of it helping your students thrive. Believe in your students. Bear in mind that:

It's not always abouttrying to fix somethingthat's broken. (4)

Helping students achieving their goals comes hand in hand with creating ideal conditions for learning. When students feel respected and valued learning comes much more naturally.The following steps will help you create ideal conditions for learning and help each student reach their full potential.

1. HAPPY STUDENT LEARNS MORE

Happy teachers make happy learners.Keep your students happy.Foster positive emotions.
Positive emotions tend to help us remember more complex things. New research reports that happiness is contagious and getting connected to happy people improves your own happiness.

2. CREATE POSITIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

Start with the classroom itself. Get rid of blank walls, envision the colourful possibilities. Provide an opportunity for more passive absorption of information. Decorations can help develop your class’ sense of community. Next, turn on some music. Music, one of the joys of life, can be one of the joys of learning as well. It establishes positive learning state, energizes learning activities, increases attention, improves motivation etc.
However, the principal part is building rapport with your students. Students learn willing and better from a person they can relate to. Get to know your students and let them get to know you. Explain that you are partners working together: you bring the expertise, they bring the energy. Make students feel trusted and independent by giving them options.
And most importantly, be there for them.

3. GIVE STUDENTS OPPORTUNITIES TO GROW

Teaching English shouldn’t only be about grammar and vocabulary anymore. Challenge your students, bring activities that develop creativity and critical thinking. Take teaching to the next level, don’t bore them with doing the same type of exercises over and over.

 4. COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY

The importance of good communication skills cannot be underestimated.  A teacher who can communicate well with students can inspire them to learn. However, communication is not only about using the right words.  Be aware of your gestures.  Good presentation skills include a powerful body language supported by verbal skills.This can create a long-lasting impression in the minds of students.

5. REWARD STUDENTS WITH COMPLIMENTS

Nothing can change your mood from sad to happy than gratitude. Tell your students when they do something right. Appreciate them, everyone likes to feel appreciated. In addition to that, studies suggest that taking time to compliment students improves student motivation and learning.

6. BE A LEADER

You are more than a teacher. Every teacher is a leader. Teachers lead students, they are the ones who guide them on their journey to knowledge. To be a good leader means motivating your students to perform to their fullest. In order to do that you need to do 3 things:  get to know your students, find out what drives them and believe in them.

It's not always abouttrying to fix somethingthat's broken. (5)7. MAKE A DIFFERENCE

Be aware of your superpower. Use it to bring out the best of your students. Why? Because you CAN.

 

Sources:

“How to Decorate Your Classroom to Maximize Learning.” TeachHUB. N.p., n.d. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

Cjohn171. “Johns Hopkins University School of Education Music and Learning: Integrating Music in the Classroom.” Johns Hopkins School of Education – Home. N.p., 15 May 2013. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

Monikasrivastava11. “EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION SKILLS: NEED & IMPORTANCE FOR TEACHERS.” Scribd. Scribd, n.d. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

“Teach Students to Give and Receive Compliments.” Positive Discipline. N.p., 26 Sept. 2016. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

“Don’t just be a leader. Be a rouser!” Brands & Rousers. N.p., 13 Dec. 2012. Web. 24 Mar. 2017.

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